Bohuslav Lavička Pharmaceutical and Medical Collection

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Contact info
Farmacevtsko-medicinska zbirka Bohuslava Lavičke
http://www.lek.si/sl/o-nas/lavickova-zbirka/o-zbirki
info.lek@sandoz.com
Verovškova 57, SI-1526 Ljubljana
Phone386 (0) 1 580 2111
Fax386 (0) 1 568 3517
RegionSI-1
Managed byLek d.d.
Katarina Klemenc, Corporate Communication Director
Phone386 (0) 1 580 2243
Fax386 (0) 1 580 2432





Displayed on the ground floor of the Lek company's business and information centre, the collection comprises a permanent display of pharmaceutical and medical accessories, dating from Roman antiquity to the present day, including surgical instruments and accessories from two-fully furnished pharmacies dating from the 16th to 19th centuries. All the exhibits were collected by a single private collector, Bohuslav Lavička (1879–1942), who was a pharmacist in Tržič and for four decades collected items connected with the development of the natural and medical sciences. Lek bought the collection from Lavička's descendants, and first displayed the works publicly in a museum format in 1986. In 2002 the Government of Slovenia declared the collection of national importance.

Library and collection

The library of the collection comprises over 400 units from the fields of classical literature, French literature, philosophy, education, and the natural sciences. The natural sciences section ranges from ancient books on alchemy to contemporary chemistry, physics and biology manuals. Along with the many incunabula, two pages from the Gutenberg Bible deserve special attention (printed in 1491 in Basel, Switzerland) as the Bible includes some of the first written hygienic codes, and is therefore, also a medical document.

The archaeological and historical sections of the collection include prehistoric and antique surgical tools, as well as ceramic and other vessels from the period between the 15th and the 19th century. The vessels are displayed in furnishings acquired from two old pharmacies. Especially notable is the pharmaceutical armoire, which is believed to have come from a Tyrolean convent pharmacy and contains "medicinal substances" preserved from the 16th century.

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